Sunday, December 18, 2016

Williamsburg print gown photos (Fig Leaf Patterns 101)

In the first post about this gown I only showed you photos of the gown on my mannequin (and a teaser). I've worn the dress three time since then this year so now there are plenty of photos of it being worn. Since I already shared most of my thoughts about this gown and pattern in the original post, this is going to be one picture-heavy post. 

The first time I got to wear this gown was at an 18th century assembly in March. 


Now here's something I don't think I mentioned earlier - I'm not sure I like how short the bodice is at the front bottom - as you can see, it makes the waistband of the petticoat to show. Also, the skirt of the gown starts from really far at the side so the pocket slits (of the gown and petticoats) do not align, thus making the gown pocket slits useless. Actually, both this and the problem with the petticoat waistband could be fixed just by moving the start of the skirt towards the center front. If you ever plan to use this pattern, you might want consider doing that.


Interestingly, the pattern envelope illustrations do not seem to show the side back seams (or not very clearly anyway). I originally thought the bodice would have just four pieces + shoulder pieces (well, actually it does, because the seams next to center front are tucks). Not that it matters but I figured I should mention.



 And the second time I had the chance to wear this gown was already posted on the blog, at L'Amusette's annual masquerade ball. With a white petticoat, gown skirt hem down, and a black belt the look was a little later than the one above. In the first photo below you can also see how roomy the sleeves originally were (as mentioned in my first post about this gown)!



The gown has a train. Another interesting thing about the pattern is that I didn't have to shorten the skirt even though I'm shorter than average. But the pattern has the original skirt length so I guess that means I'm the same height, from waist down, as the original wearer.


And the third wearing was on the picnic that I also already blogged about. This time the skirt was drawn up with tapes again, to keep the train from getting dirty. I had also made new more tight fitting sleeves (!) so here's how they currently look:





16 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing details of this dress! You are darling- it suits you so perfectly! <3 The whole dress is stunning in its simplicity. The fit is so good!! (have you ever tried pinning the petticoat to the dress at the waist? that is my solution for my (ahem, many!) short-waisted dresses!) I think I really need to look into this pattern... great inspiration!

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    1. Thank you! :) I don't think I have tried pinning the petticoat to the dress but I will definitely give it a try the next time I wear this dress! Thanks for the tip! This pattern is wonderful and I'd love to see more versions of it! And given how good it is I'm surprised it isn't more popular (I could find only a couple of photos of the pattern made up on the net).

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  2. The fabric is absolutely lovely, and the dress turned out so well! I love all the different color combos and ways to wear the dress. Fabulous!

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  3. I like so much the color and the tissu
    How de o you d o the skirt and petticoat
    What did you use pattern

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  4. I like so much the color and the tissu what did you use pattern

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    1. Thank you! :) It's Fig Leaf Patterns 101 but it seems to be out of stock at the moment: http://neheleniapatterns.com/product/open-robe-1771-1785-fi101/?lang=en I don't know why it isn't available for purchase from the Fig Leaf Pattrns website/Etsy at the moment either: http://figleafpatterns.com/gallery.html Let's hope it comes back later!

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  5. It's a gorgeous dress, and very nice to see how it's styled in different ways. I also adore the close-up photo in the beginning, super pretty!

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  6. This is absolutely breathtaking. The shade of blue is so exquisite, and I love the floral print. I also love that there are so many ways to change the look. Beautiful!!

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    1. Thank you! It's nice to hear you like it so much! :)

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  7. So pretty! It's amazing how much the look changes with your accessories and petticoat. :)

    Happy new year!
    Quinn

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  8. Your dress is beautiful! I would like to make a 18th century dress for myself and found your blog. I do not have any experience with period clothing. I have been looking at that same pattern. What pattern did you use for the petticoat and the scarf? Thank you so much for blogging about it and all your links to fabrics etc.

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    1. Hi! Thank you! :) I made my own pattern for the neckerchief (scarf) and to make a petticoat you don't even need one: http://mantuadiary.blogspot.fi/2008/07/perfectly-pleated-petticoats.html Since you say you don't have any experience in period clothing, I thought I might mention that I think Costume Close-up by Linda Baumgarten is great for understanding 18th century sewing techniques! :) Looking back now, it's a book I would definitely wanted to have when I was just beginning!

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